The Ridge to Coast, Rain to Tap: Sustainable Water Supply Project (R2CR2T) is an integrated approach to addressing flooding in the Cagayan River basin on Mindanao in the Philippines. R2CR2T is a Public Private Partnership led by VEI together with the partners COWD (Cagayan de Oro Water District), FITC, UTPI/Hineleban Foundation Inc. (HFI), Philippines- and Netherlands Red Cross, Cagayan de Oro River Basin Management Council (CDORBMC), and Wetlands International. R2CR2T is funded by RVO through the Sustainable Water Fund programme.

The Cagayan River Basin is characterized by an upstream mountainous area with steeply sloping terrain towards downstream Cagayan de Oro city. Upstream deforestation and land degradation are known to increase risk of flooding in the city, which is at present already at a high level. One expected outcome of R2CR2T is to have an enabling environment for stakeholders, both private and public sector, to undertake activities related to sustainable land management in the Cagayan River Basin. A Decision Support Tool (DST) for identifying critical areas and approaches for rehabilitation and its benefits regarding flood risk reduction, soil erosion reduction, and enhancing dry season flows, will be developed based on a scientifically-sound hydrological model for the watershed of the Cagayan River.

FutureWater was hired to advise on the development of the DST and hydrological model, critically review the quality and applicability of (intermediate) outputs by the local team and their service providers, and provide an external and international ‘helicopter view’ on the eco-hydrological aspects of the project. In a general sense, FutureWater supports the R2CR2T project team to maximize the impact of the DST will have for the CDORB region and stakeholders.

The Inle Lake in Myanmar is renowned for a number of traditional cultural and livelihood practices, which have made it one of the main attractions for Myanmar’s booming tourism industry. The lake is, however, suffering environmental degradation from the combined effects of unsustainable resource use, increasing population pressures, climate variability and rapid tourism development. UNDP is supporting the establishment of ILMA, which will have the mandate to manage conservation activities in the Inle Lake protected area.

Under this project, a set of maps will be developed and delivered to the ILMA geodatabase. Different methods, including satellite remote sensing and GIS, will be integrated to complete an updated boundary demarcation of the protected area, based on the Inle Lake watershed boundaries and recent developments in land use. Key ecosystem services of Inle Lake region will be mapped, which will inform an updated zoning (core zone, buffer zone, transition zone) of Inle Lake protected area. Workshops and bilateral meetings are organized to consult with the government stakeholders at several steps during the project, and a training workshop on ecosystem services mapping will be organized at the end of the project.

Asian Development Bank (ADB) Technical Assistance (TA) 7610-CAM supports the preparation of MOWRAM’s Roadmap and Investment Program for Irrigation and Water Resources Management, 2019-2033. This investment program provides a comprehensive and strategic framework for the country’s investment in the water resources and irrigation sector.

The current project under TA 7610-CAM concerns (i) rapid water resources assessment of the Tonle Sap and the Mekong Delta river basin groups (24 basins); (ii) ecological assessment of these two river basin groups to identify areas for development and conservation; (iii) detailed surface water resources assessment for five river basins within these groups.

The overall project objective is to support MOWRAM to make more informed, evidence-based water resources management and irrigation investment decisions through better understanding of water resources and ecosystems of two river basin groups: the Tonle Sap and the Mekong Delta and at least five selected river basins within these groups. These river basins are to be selected based on their current and projected level of water stress. The health of high-priority ecosystems and their water demands are assessed in relation to basin hydrological characteristics and foreseen development of water resources.

Outputs of the project are:

  • A comprehensive knowledge base on water resources and eco-hydrology in 24 river basins
  • Hydrological characterization of 24 river basins
  • Quantification of environmental flow requirements for 24 basins
  • Selection of the five most water-stressed basins
  • Recommended options for efficient and equitable water allocation
  • Targeted investment options in the irrigation sector
  • Coupled set of calibrated hydrological / water allocation models
  • Geospatial data on (eco-)hydrology compatible with the national Water Resources Information System (WRIS) currently under development

FutureWater is the lead firm in the assignment and executes the water resources modelling components of the project.

The framework used for this evaluation has been the IFC Performance Standards 3 (Resource Efficiency and Pollution Prevention) and 6 (Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Management of Living Natural Resources), complemented with what is considered good practice.

The Local Action Group (LAG) Campoder CAMPODER at the Murcia Region (SE Spain) is an Association for Rural Development which aims to develop programs, projects and actions for the comprehensive and sustainable development of its territory. These actions encompass activities for the conservation and restoration of the environment, the exploitation and promotion of local resources (agriculture, industry), the improvement of the rural infrastructure, and the conservation and strengthening of the historical, artistic and cultural heritage.

During the period 2014-2020, some of the LAGs at the Murcia Region and their development strategies are going to be redesigned to fit with the priorities set out in the Rural Development Programme and the Europe 2020 Strategy. In this framework, new policies of development should pursue the sustainable management and use of the natural resources, and allow a balanced and inclusive economic development in regards to peri-urban areas.

This project aims to advertise about the environmental assets found in the LAG Campoder, and to quantify using social and economic techniques the degree in which these assets are perceived by local population. The projects has been organized in two tasks:

  • Characterization and description of three representative protected areas located in the GAL Campoder. FutureWater is in charge of this task.
  • Identification, and economic assessment and valuation by choice experiments, of the main management alternatives. This task is addressed by the Polytechnic University of Cartagena and University of Murcia.

A book titled “Caracterization and assessment of development preferences of the main protected areas located at the LAG Campoder” (in Spanish) has been published and can be downloaded from here. A video has been also edited in which the peculiarities and environmental assets of the study region are highlighted.

For more information, please contact with the PI of the project, Francisco Alcón (Universidad Politécnica de Cartagena) or Sergio Contreras (FutureWater).

Rapid land use changes in the Red River Basin threaten water resources. Urbanization, deforestation, intensive agriculture etc. cause pollution, ecosystem degradation, increased greenhouse gas emissions, floods and droughts. This project will be working in the Day River Catchment, a Red River distributary important for Hanoi, where most of these problems are manifest.

More inclusive development of land and water resources is possible with interventions such as sustainable urban drainage, agroforestry and minimum tillage, but trade-offs between land development and riverine ecosystems remain. It is a challenge to quantify the impact of interventions, to feed this knowledge into regional and national planning systems and to incorporate more inclusive practices into private sector investments. This project specifically sets out to address these challenges.

The project will develop equitable and economically viable pathways for the land and water resources of the Red River Basin that maximize social and environmental benefits over the next decades. The project will develop these pathways through multilevel stakeholder dialogues, using scenario thinking, and support this process with the (further) development of tools and frameworks for governing water and land, including further development of Water Accounting (WA+). WA+ is the systematic process of identifying, recognizing, quantifying, reporting, assuring and publishing information about water, the rights to that water, and the obligations against that water. WA was originally developed by IWMI and has been modified and upgraded by UNESCO-IHE into WA+. An ‘ecosystem service sheet’, showing the benefits of ecosystem to humans, will be developed using the results of this project. In this way, the project will develop an innovative tool for inclusive decision-making that can used at a global scale to support water resources planning. Key users are involved as project partners to ensure that project outputs are designed in such a way that they are beneficial to them and that outputs will be turned in to outcomes.

Within this project, FutureWater will work on remote sensing analysis and hydrological modelling of tradeoffs in different scenarios regarding the future development of the Day Basin.

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